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Lower Rosseau Falls
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens

The Muskoka Autumn Colour Spectacular Photographic Workshop wrapped up on October 3rd. I am just getting around to the follow-up reort now. I have been swamped prepping for my Lake Superior Retreat as well as organizing new events for 2019.

Although the fall colours were slow in their progression this year we were able to find some lovely colour at a few of our destinations. We had two long days of photography as we visited numerous waterfalls and rivers through the Muskoka District, from Huntsville to Dwight to Rosseau.

Wilson’s Falls
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens

Although the water levels at Wilson’s Falls were very low it turned out this provided wonderful opportunities to capture some autumn colour and the red granite river bed while the river defined the foreground elements. The Oxtongue River near Dwight is often a busy location during fall colour, but I ensured that the workshop group arrived early to have several hours of the river to ourselves. By the time we were wrapping up here there were many people starting to arrive.

Oxtongue River
Nikon D800, Laowa 12mm Zero D lens

Ragged Falls on the Oxtongur River in Ragged Falls Provincial Park is another very popular destination however, the surrounding cedar forest is not conducive to autumn colour/ Nonetheless, we arrived shortly before sunset and were greeted with wonderful light!

Ragged Falls, Oxtongue River
Nikon D800, Laowa 12mm Zero D lens

Throughout the workshop we experienced much light rain. It often rained heaviest when we would took our lunch breaks. The rainy weather did provide us with the absolute best conditions possible for our intended subject matter. The rain also allowed us ample opportunity to explore intimate forest details sue to the wonderful even lighting from the overcast cloud cover.

Old Growth White Pine Roots
Nikon D800, Laowa 12mm Zero D lens

 

Forest Details
Nikon D800, Laowa 12mm Zero D lens

 

Granite Details
Nikon D800, Nikon 28-300mm lens

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The 'Blue Hour' on Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 50, f22 @ 3 seconds

The ‘Blue Hour’ on Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 50, f22 @ 3 seconds

During the Canadian Thanksgiving weekend I traveled between the Georgian Bay shoreline and Muskoka area waterfalls. The weather was a mixed bag of rain, cloud, wind, and sun. I have just found some time to process some of the photos that were created on that weekend and wanted to share them with you. The Georgian Bay shoreline images were created after the sun had set. I love this time of day as the exposures get longer and some really cool effects and colors can be found, like the ‘blue hour’ image above. I like how the wave action has blurred the reeds in the foreground, capturing the passage of time.

In-camera HDR along Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 64, f22 @ 13 seconds.

In-camera HDR along Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 64, f22 @ 13 seconds.

Above I used the in-camera HDR function on my Nikon D800 and dialed in a low ISO of 64 for a lengthy exposure to smooth out the wave action on the bay.

Thunder Creek. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1.3 seconds

Thunder Creek. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1.3 seconds

While exploring the Georgian Bay Rugged Hiking Trail I could hear the distinct sound of a waterfall within the surrounding woodland. I short walk led me to this wonderful cascade on Thunder Creek, which empties into Georgian Bay. I am assuming this small waterfall is only active after periods of heavy rain. On previous visits here in the summer months I do not recall hearing any waterfall as I made my way across Thunder Creek.

Last Light at Rosseau River. Muskoka Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 100, f16 @ 0.6 seconds.

Last Light at Rosseau River. Muskoka Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 100, f16 @ 0.6 seconds.

By the end of what would be my last day of creating images this fall, I found myself at Lower Rosseau Falls as the sun was dipping beneath the horizon. A lovely puddle had formed in a depression in the granite, which had collected rain water, and was now reflecting the lovely autumn colors of a sugar maple tree on the opposite bank. A low perspective ensured that the reflection occupied much of the puddle’s surface.

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1.6 seconds.

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1.6 seconds.

Another visit was planned to Hatchery Falls during the Thanksgiving weekend as well for one last go around with the fall colors. In this image I positioned myself directly at the river edge, beneath a slight over-hang in the rock, which protected me and my gear from the river’s spray. After framing the scene and confirming via Live View that I was pleased with the composition I created several photos each time I would increase the ISO settings to capture the water at different levels of blur. I settled on the scene that I created using ISO 200. Often when I am creating landscape imagery after I have composed the scene through the view finder I will activate the Live View feature of the Nikon D800 and take two steps backwards to analyze the scene on the LCD screen. You got it so you might as well use 🙂

Please note: On Monday, October 27th I will be presenting for GRIPS (Grand River Imaging & Photographic Society) at the Kitchener East Presbyterian Church. Start time will be at 7:30 p.m. Click here for the calendar page on the GRIPS website and for the map.

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River Detail on the Rosseau River - Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm, ISO 800, f16 @ 30 seconds

River Detail on the Rosseau River – Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm, ISO 800, f16 @ 30 seconds

I created this image during the summer of 2013. I am only getting around to processing it now. I have been very busy these last few months with not a lot of time to get out for fresh photos, but I am looking forward to this season’s fall colors which seem to be shaping up nicely, so far. When I photograph along rivers I always take the time to seek out intimate views of the river’s details. This image was created quite late on the evening of August 20, 2013 on a clear night, hence the blue tones throughout the photo. Some folks tend to dislike these blue tones often referring to them as a color cast. In scenes such as this though, they can actually add more interest to the resulting image. I was particularly drawn to the curvature and subtle reddish tones in the granite here more so than the flowing water, however, the flowing water does add a nice passage of time element.

Please click on the photo to view the larger, sharper version.

 

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Rosseau River_600

During my last stay at the family cottage on Horseshoe Lake in Ontario’s Muskoka region I chose to visit Lower Rosseau Falls on a rain-filled day. As I made the half hour trek over to the river there was a persistent drizzle, which is absolutely perfect for waterfall photography. As soon as I arrived, as luck would have it, the skies began to look as though it was going to clear up. I rushed to garb a few images before the river was in full sun. Rather than depart and head back when the sun shone full, I decided to play around with the Nikon D800’s in-camera HDR feature for both the sunlit scenes and the those whereby I waited for some cloud cover. This feature will produce a 108 MB TIFF file!

What else is new with the images in this post? I have processed and sharpened all of them using the new TKAction Panel from Tony Kuyper. If you enjoy photographing landscapes and wish to get the absolute most out of your image files then simply click here and read through and watch the videos as well. On the Special Offer page you can purchase the complete package for only $79US.

Please click on the images to see the larger, sharper versions and let me know which one is your favorite 🙂

Rosseau River_611

Rosseau River_637

Rosseau River_626

 

 

 

Rosseau River_659

 

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Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Ontario, Canada

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

How often do you revisit locations for landscape photography? I do so often. Why? As each season passes and years fall away conditions change. These images of Lower Rosseau Falls in Ontario’s famous Muskoka region are the perfect example. Over the last few years the water levels have been much lower, but with the region being hit with a significant amount of snowfall this past winter, the subsequent snowmelt has raised water levels so that the river is now a raging torrent. This has created numerous, new photographic possibilities and has seen the return of the double cascade created by the rock mid-stream in the above photo.

To find out how to get to Lower Rosseau Falls and to learn more about great Ontario landscape photography locations please consider my eBook “A Photographer’s Guide to the Ontario Landscape” – the first ever comprehensive guide to landscape photography in Ontario.

Do click on each of these images to see the larger, sharper versions.

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada.

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

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Rosseau River_5055

One location I have visited frequently this past year has been that of Lower Rosseau Falls on the Rosseau River. I am a big advocate of revisiting locations over and over and over. With each new visit to a location different elements tend to grab your attention. Perhaps it is because the light on the scene is ever-changing and never the same as it was before, or our frame of mind at the time.

During the Canadian Thanksgiving weekend I was up at the family cottage on Horseshoe Lake to close up for the coming winter. The family cottage is only a short drive from Lower Rosseau Falls. So, when most of the chores were completed I took a short  break to capture a few fresh images of the river. On this visit I decided I would make my way down to the mouth of the river where it flows into Lake Rosseau. When the water levels in the river are high, a portion of the water gets diverted around the rocky terrain, which then flows back into the main stream downriver creating a small pleasing cascade.  I have always been attracted to the directional differences of the river here when this occurs. Above and below are two different compositions of this scene.

I was initially disappointed that the autumn color was past peak at this point in time with significant leaf fall, but do think this transition phase of the forest can be equally beautiful. What do you think?

Please click on each of the photos to see the larger, sharper versions.

Rosseau River_5046

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Rosseau River_1635Rosseau River in Ontario’s Muskoka Region

Recently I purchased the new Nikon 18-35mm lens and have had a blast using it on my favorite subjects – waterfalls and bullfrogs.  If I could only have one lens it would most certainly be a wide angle zoom lens. The corner-to-corner sharpness of this lens is amazing. I will do a more in-depth summary of my thoughts on this lens in the near future. Above is a recent capture made along the Rosseau River. The water levels were quite low during my visit and I was able to cross the river to an area that is inaccessible during periods of higher flow. This image was created using the Nikon 18-35mm lens on a Nikon D800 firmly mounted on my tripod. An ISO of 250 was selected with the aperture set to f16 for an exposure of 1.3 seconds. After reviewing a few test images on the D800’s LCD screen to critique the amount of blur to the flowing river, I determined this to be the look I wanted to achieve. Below you will see a Black & White conversion of the image and a creative rendition too. The B&W version was created using Nik / Google’s Silver Efex Pro 2, while the creative version was created with Topaz Labs Black & White Effects 2.

Please remember to click on each of the images to view the larger, sharper version and take a moment to let us know which is your favorite and why.

Rosseau River_1635-B&WRosseau River in B&W (Silver Efex Pro 2)

Rosseau River_1635-B&W EffectsRosseau River – B&W Effects 2

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