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Posts Tagged ‘laowa 12mm zero d lens’

Sydenham River on the Niagara Escarpment at Inglis Falls, Ontario, Canada

On my drive home from the recently concluded Bruce Peninsula Photography Workshop I made a brief stop at Inglis Falls Conservation Area. It has been many years since I visited this location. I was also a little disappointed as I personally think the area has suffered some decline due to government cutbacks. Nonetheless, I made my way downstream from the falls to scenic sections of the river that I have long wanted to explore with the Laowa 12mm Zero D Lens.

Sydenham River on the Niagara Escarpment at Inglis Falls, Ontario, Canada

I carefully made my way out onto to a small 2 foot sized rock mid-stream to first, and foremost, get myself away from distracting shoreline elements and to put the viewer into the river. If you are not accustomed to entering a ragging river I do not encourage trying this. I have been doing so for several decades and always take extra precautions when doing so.

Sydenham River on the Niagara Escarpment at Inglis Falls, Ontario, Canada

Each of these images were photographed with no filtration. I accidentally forgot to grab my polarizing filter for the Laowa 12mm lens before I made my decent into the river gorge. I was on limited time and figured that the overcast conditions and the fast flow of the river would provide sufficient exposures to achieve the amount of  blur I like. I was not mistaken.

Sydenham River on the Niagara Escarpment at Inglis Falls, Ontario, Canada

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Rusty Old Wreck Interior
Nikon D800, Laowa 12mm Zero D Lens

Without a doubt rusty old dilapidated automobiles look great with a touch of grunge processing added to them. On Thursday June 21st I visited a nearby auto wrecker to photograph several old abandoned cars and trucks. I was quite fascinated by the state of decay inside this particular old car.  Using my amazingly wide and razor sharp Laowa 12mm Zero D Lens on my Nikon D800 I set out to create this extreme wide angle, interior view. The above image was created from one RAW image file. In Adobe Camera Raw I made adjustments to the Clarity, Contrast, Shadow, and Highlights slider and also tweaked the Vibrance slider as well. I then opened the image into Photoshop CC and went straight for my Nik Color Efex Filters to apply my simplified grunge processing technique. First a treatment of Detail Extractor was applied, which in Photoshop I reduced the opacity of the layer to roughly 70%. Secondly I applied a touch of Nik Color Efex Pro Contrast filter. I then saved the image as an 8-bit TIFF and created my watermarked low-res JPEG for web use. I spent no more than 10 minutes on optimizing this image using the two NIK filters for a simplified, but incredibly effective grunge look.

 

WORKSHOP NOTES:

I was pleased to sign up 3 additional participants for the Lake Superior Wild & Scenic Photography Retreat in October over the last couple of weeks. There is now only 1 spot available.

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