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Katherine Cove Lake Superior Provincial Park Ontario, Canada

Katherine Cove
Lake Superior Provincial Park
Ontario, Canada

On Monday, April 27th at 7:00 p.m. I will be presenting “A Photographer’s Guide to the Ontario Landscape” for the Oakville Camera Club at the Queen Elizabeth Park Community and Cultural Centre located at 2302 Bridge Road in Oakville, Ontario.

The presentation is based around my popular eBook, which is an in-depth resource to landscape photography in Ontario. The eBook will be available for purchace, on CD, at the presentation for the low price of $20 CDN.

Hope to see you there :)

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Sunrise on the Agawa River in Ontario's Lake Superior Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm Fisheye Lens, ISO 1250 f11 @ 1/400 sec.

Sunrise on the Agawa River in Ontario’s Lake Superior Provincial Park.   Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm Fisheye Lens, ISO 1250 f11 @ 1/400 sec.

I have been on a mission lately to go through some of my folders of older RAW captures that for one reason or another has eluded the optimizing step. Surprisingly several of the ones I took the time to work on over the last few days were from one of my favorite places on Earth – Lake Superior. The rugged terrain and stunning shoreline vistas to be found in the Lake Superior region are a must see for anyone who enjoys landscape photography.

Rocky Shoreline of Lake Superior near the Coldwater River. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 50, f22 @ 1/13 sec.

Rocky Shoreline of Lake Superior.                          Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 50, f22 @ 1/13 sec.

In the scene below I was playing around with my B+W 10-stop Neutral Density Filter to create some motion blur to the mid-day clouds and also to ‘calm’ the waves of Lake Superior.

Lake Superior Provincial Park, Nikon D800, Nikon 24-85mm VR Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 20 sec.

Lake Superior Provincial Park near the Coldwater River                                    Nikon D800, Nikon 24-85mm VR Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 20 sec.

Often I will use my Nikon 80-400mm VR lens to extract intimate scenes from within the landscape as I did below with the spruce trees reflecting in the water’s of the Agawa River.

Spruce Tree Reflections in the Agawa River. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 400, f22 @ 5 sec.

Spruce Tree Reflections in the Agawa River.                                                                          Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 400, f22 @ 5 sec.

Often Lake Superior has some decent wave action whereby you can play around with wave blurs crashing into the shoreline. Below was not necessarily a day of impressive waves, but it was a day of fun trying to capture interesting blurs from the waves here as they did hit the granite shoreline.

Wave Blur on Lake Superior. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm Lens, ISO 100, f29 @ 1/10 sec.

Wave Blur on Lake Superior.                                                                                                Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm Lens, ISO 100, f29 @ 1/10 sec.

When faced with a lovely sunset at Katherine Cove as seen below, rather than opt for a graduated neutral density filter or in-camera HDR, I decided to create two exposures – one for the rocks and one for the sky and then manually blend them in Photoshop CS6 to achieve the desired results.

Please do remember to click on each image to view the larger, sharper version.

Stay tuned for ‘Odds & Ends – Part 2

Katherine Cove in Lake Superior Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens

Katherine Cove in Lake Superior Provincial Park.                                                       Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens

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Stones on Lake Superior Shoreline. Nion D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 200, f22 @ 25 seconds.

Lake Superior Shoreline Details. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 200, f22 @ 25 seconds.

I have been busy trying to catch-up on a back-log of image processing over the last few days. Today I spent some time optimizing some of my images from my 2013 trip to Lake Superior Provincial Park. I remember this mid-September evening well, the temperatures were getting chilly, the sun had all but gone, and I was playing around with some long, intimate landscapes of shoreline details at Old Woman Bay. These small stones are often a mix of colors and are rounded and smooth as silk, from centuries of wave action.

Please do click on each image to see the larger, sharper version.

Lake Superior Shoreline Details. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 500, f22 at 30 seconds.

Lake Superior Shoreline Details. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 500, f22 @ 30 seconds.

Lake Superior Shoreline Details. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 100, f6.3 @ 1.6 seconds

Lake Superior Shoreline Details. Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens, ISO 100, f6.3 @ 1.6 seconds

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Lake Superior Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 20 seconds, B+W 10-stop Neutral Density Filter

Lake Superior Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 20 seconds, B+W 10-stop Neutral Density Filter

This evening the winter wind is howling outside and snow squalls are rolling through the region, so I decided to play around with converting some older photos to black and white. I have always liked the original color versions of these images but for one reason or another I never did get around to optimizing them. Often when situations like this arise I will open the images into Nik / Google’s Silver Efex Pro 2 for a B&W conversion that suits the scene. In the opening photo, which was created on the shores of Lake Superior near the mouth of the Coldwater River I used a 10-stop neutral density filter to ‘calm‘ the incoming waves and help reveal the boulders beneath the surface. A small crop from the top to evict a rather boring cloudless sky rounded out the image optimization.

In the Georgian Bay scene below that was created in Ontario’s Killbear Provincial Park I used my Tiffen 3-stop neutral density filter to achieve the same calming effect on the bay, which allows us to focus our attention on the foreground rocks, which received a light-handed dose of Nik / Google’s Detail Extractor from Color Efex

Georgian Bay at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 5 seconds. Tiffen 3-stop Neutral Density Filter

Georgian Bay at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 5 seconds. Tiffen 3-stop Neutral Density Filter

After creating the above scene on Georgian bay I simply turned around to create one of the terrain that was behind me. Killbear Provincial Park is noted for its spectacular vistas of Georgian Bay and the rugged granite shoreline is wonderful for both color and B&W images.

Rugged Terrain at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm EX DG f2.8 Fisheye Lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1/200.

Rugged Terrain at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm EX DG f2.8 Fisheye Lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1/200.

And finally below is an older capture created on the Sixteen Mile Creek at Hilton Falls Conservation Area upstream from Hilton Falls. This lovely river and waterfall are situated on the Niagara Escarpment. Many of the waterfalls and rivers of the Niagara Escarpment are best viewed in early spring when water levels are typically high.

Sixteen Mile Creek. Hilton Falls Conservation Area. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 24mm. ISO 100, f16 @ 1.3 seconds, Nikon Neutral Polarizing Filter

Sixteen Mile Creek in Hilton Falls Conservation Area. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 24mm. ISO 100, f16 @ 1.3 seconds, Nikon Neutral Polarizing Filter

Please do remember to click on each image to view the larger, sharper version.

On another note: I am now active on Intsagram. You can connect with me on Intsagram at MCLACHLANWILD. I have also added an Instagram widget to the sidebar of the blog for easy access. Hope to see you over at Instagram too :)

 

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In-camera Aspen Tree Blur near Coldwater, Ontario

In-camera Aspen Tree Blur near Coldwater, Ontario

Here are a few recently optimized images from my photo excursions in September and October that I wanted to share with folks. I have been swamped lately with various projects as well as getting caught up on a large backlog of image files sitting on my hard-drives…never seems to be enough time and the backlog keeps getting bigger. Hope you like this collection of recently edited photographs.

To read my most recent article in Denise Ippolito’s Creative Photography eMini-Magazine click here. Be sure to subscribe to this on-line creative photography magazine as it is loaded with tons of useful info and tips and it is absolutely free.

Please click on each of the photos to see the larger, sharper versions.

Thompson's Rapids in Ontario's Almaguin Highlands

Thompson’s Rapids in Ontario’s Almaguin Highlands

Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario.

Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario.

River aux Sables at Chutes Provincial Park. Massey, Ontario.

River aux Sables at Chutes Provincial Park. Massey, Ontario.

Magnetawan River in Ontario's Almaguin Highlands.

Magnetawan River in Ontario’s Almaguin Highlands.

 

 

 

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Katherine Cove, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

Katherine Cove, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

During my September visit to Ontario’s Lake Superior Provincial Park I spent a couple of nights at Katherine Cove for sunset imagery. On the particular evening that the above photograph was created there was not much interest in the sky and any lovely sunset colors were lacking as well. Once the sun had set I began creating a few long exposures and about a half hour later I noticed the details in the rock formations along the shore and instinctively knew that a wide angle lens would be perfect for this composition. Since there was little interest in the sky it was evident that I should exclude as much of that element as possible, and concentrate more on the rocky details. Using the new Nikon 18-35mm lens on my Nikon D800 I carefully framed the scene making sure not to clip the small puddle on the left side of the frame. And in the upper right corner you will noticed that I made certain that the rock out in the lake was positioned to help anchor down that area of the composition too. Since the sun was long gone by this point I needed to dial in an ISO of 800 and for adequate depth of field an aperture of f16 was selected, this gave me an exposure of 15 seconds. This lengthy exposure was the perfect solution to smoothing out every ripple on the lake to create the illusion of calmness, which in turn allowed the moonlight shimmering on the water to be recorded nicely in the final result. This image has become one of my favorites from the Lake Superior excursion. I’d love to hear your thoughts?

On the social media side of things I am now on Google+ please click here to add me  to your circle. You can also Like my Facebook page here or follow along on Twitter by clicking here.

Please remember to click on the above image to view the sharper, larger version.

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Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

The Lake Superior shoreline is often characterized by rugged, rocky outcrops. One of my preferred locations within Ontario’s Lake Superior Provincial Park can be found near the mouth of the Coldwater River, along the Coastal Hiking Trail. At this spot there is a large ‘whale-back’ rock right next to the rugged coast that has been smoothed perfectly through the ages by the action of waves washing over it in the height of severe storm activity. On my most recent trip to Lake Superior in September I was determined to create an image to illustrate this massive rock. On this trip I added a Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fish-eye Lens to my tool-kit. This lens was on loan from Gentec International, the Canadian distributor for Sigma lenses in Canada. Fisheye lenses will open up a whole new world of creativity to the photographer who has yet to give them a try. Noted for their extreme distortion qualities, fish-eye lenses when used effectively will produce pleasing results. The resulting effect I like best is that which is achieved by pointing the lens downward to create a rounded horizon. I often find this effect to be most pleasing when looking out over a large body of water. Perhaps this is because 70% of the Earth’s surface is covered in water and the distorted effect mimics that of the globe. To create the above composition I chose to handhold the camera, utilize the virtual horizon feature to maintain a level perspective, and carefully composed the scene so that the massive rock would not merge with the trees on the distant shore.

Please remember to click on the image to see the larger, sharper version :)

 

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