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Posts Tagged ‘georgian bay’

 

Lake Superior Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 20 seconds, B+W 10-stop Neutral Density Filter

Lake Superior Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 20 seconds, B+W 10-stop Neutral Density Filter

This evening the winter wind is howling outside and snow squalls are rolling through the region, so I decided to play around with converting some older photos to black and white. I have always liked the original color versions of these images but for one reason or another I never did get around to optimizing them. Often when situations like this arise I will open the images into Nik / Google’s Silver Efex Pro 2 for a B&W conversion that suits the scene. In the opening photo, which was created on the shores of Lake Superior near the mouth of the Coldwater River I used a 10-stop neutral density filter to ‘calm‘ the incoming waves and help reveal the boulders beneath the surface. A small crop from the top to evict a rather boring cloudless sky rounded out the image optimization.

In the Georgian Bay scene below that was created in Ontario’s Killbear Provincial Park I used my Tiffen 3-stop neutral density filter to achieve the same calming effect on the bay, which allows us to focus our attention on the foreground rocks, which received a light-handed dose of Nik / Google’s Detail Extractor from Color Efex

Georgian Bay at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 5 seconds. Tiffen 3-stop Neutral Density Filter

Georgian Bay at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 100, f16 @ 5 seconds. Tiffen 3-stop Neutral Density Filter

After creating the above scene on Georgian bay I simply turned around to create one of the terrain that was behind me. Killbear Provincial Park is noted for its spectacular vistas of Georgian Bay and the rugged granite shoreline is wonderful for both color and B&W images.

Rugged Terrain at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm EX DG f2.8 Fisheye Lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1/200.

Rugged Terrain at Killbear Provincial Park. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm EX DG f2.8 Fisheye Lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1/200.

And finally below is an older capture created on the Sixteen Mile Creek at Hilton Falls Conservation Area upstream from Hilton Falls. This lovely river and waterfall are situated on the Niagara Escarpment. Many of the waterfalls and rivers of the Niagara Escarpment are best viewed in early spring when water levels are typically high.

Sixteen Mile Creek. Hilton Falls Conservation Area. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 24mm. ISO 100, f16 @ 1.3 seconds, Nikon Neutral Polarizing Filter

Sixteen Mile Creek in Hilton Falls Conservation Area. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 24mm. ISO 100, f16 @ 1.3 seconds, Nikon Neutral Polarizing Filter

Please do remember to click on each image to view the larger, sharper version.

On another note: I am now active on Intsagram. You can connect with me on Intsagram at MCLACHLANWILD. I have also added an Instagram widget to the sidebar of the blog for easy access. Hope to see you over at Instagram too ๐Ÿ™‚

 

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The 'Blue Hour' on Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 50, f22 @ 3 seconds

The ‘Blue Hour’ on Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 50, f22 @ 3 seconds

During the Canadian Thanksgiving weekend I traveled between the Georgian Bay shoreline and Muskoka area waterfalls. The weather was a mixed bag of rain, cloud, wind, and sun. I have just found some time to process some of the photos that were created on that weekend and wanted to share them with you. The Georgian Bay shoreline images were created after the sun had set. I love this time of day as the exposures get longer and some really cool effects and colors can be found, like the ‘blue hour’ image above. I like how the wave action has blurred the reeds in the foreground, capturing the passage of time.

In-camera HDR along Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 64, f22 @ 13 seconds.

In-camera HDR along Georgian Bay. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 64, f22 @ 13 seconds.

Above I used the in-camera HDR function on my Nikon D800 and dialed in a low ISO of 64 for a lengthy exposure to smooth out the wave action on the bay.

Thunder Creek. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1.3 seconds

Thunder Creek. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 400, f16 @ 1.3 seconds

While exploring the Georgian Bay Rugged Hiking Trail I could hear the distinct sound of a waterfall within the surrounding woodland. I short walk led me to this wonderful cascade on Thunder Creek, which empties into Georgian Bay. I am assuming this small waterfall is only active after periods of heavy rain. On previous visits here in the summer months I do not recall hearing any waterfall as I made my way across Thunder Creek.

Last Light at Rosseau River. Muskoka Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 100, f16 @ 0.6 seconds.

Last Light at Rosseau River. Muskoka Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 100, f16 @ 0.6 seconds.

By the end of what would be my last day of creating images this fall, I found myself at Lower Rosseau Falls as the sun was dipping beneath the horizon. A lovely puddle had formed in a depression in the granite, which had collected rain water, and was now reflecting the lovely autumn colors of a sugar maple tree on the opposite bank. A low perspective ensured that the reflection occupied much of the puddle’s surface.

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1.6 seconds.

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1.6 seconds.

Another visit was planned to Hatchery Falls during the Thanksgiving weekend as well for one last go around with the fall colors. In this image I positioned myself directly at the river edge, beneath a slight over-hang in the rock, which protected me and my gear from the river’s spray. After framing the scene and confirming via Live View that I was pleased with the composition I created several photos each time I would increase the ISO settings to capture the water at different levels of blur. I settled on the scene that I created using ISO 200. Often when I am creating landscape imagery after I have composed the scene through the view finder I will activate the Live View feature of the Nikon D800 and take two steps backwards to analyze the scene on the LCD screen. You got it so you might as well use ๐Ÿ™‚

Please note: On Monday, October 27th I will be presenting for GRIPS (Grand River Imaging & Photographic Society) at the Kitchener East Presbyterian Church. Start time will be at 7:30 p.m. Click here for the calendar page on the GRIPS website and for the map.

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Georgian Bay Shoreline After Sunset, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 400, f16 @ 6 seconds, Singh-Ray 3-stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

Georgian Bay Shoreline After Sunset, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 400, f16 @ 6 seconds, Singh-Ray 3-stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

On Friday, October 10 I made a spur-of-the-moment decision to drive from the cottage on Horseshoe Lake to the Rugged Hiking Trail in Parry Sound to catch the last rays few rays of light. This day was a mixed bag of rain, sun, and wind. I will share a number of the images that I created on the Friday evening in the days ahead, but I first wanted to share the above photo that I created several minutes after sunset. I will often remain on location well after the sun has set. Often this is when I create my most memorable imagery. Too often I see folks pack-up their gear as soon as the sun has dipped below the horizon and head-off to catch dinner or head for home. When I take the time to remain on location for extended periods of time, I am ready to witness and create imagery of the subtle or dramatic effects that the light has on the landscape. If I pack-up and head home I will surely miss something special.

In the above photograph I was immediately drawn to the veins of pink granite that stood out against the black granite. I carefully composed the scene to have these veins of pink granite entering the composition in the lower left corner and running diagonally into the scene to act as a leading line, drawing the viewer into the scene.

Please remember to click on the photo to see the larger, sharper version.

 

 

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Granite Rock Formation Along the Rugged Fitness Trail. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1/125 sec

Granite Rock Formation Along the Rugged Fitness Trail, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1/125 sec

I did another scouting trip along the Rugged Fitness Trail in Parry Sound, Ontario. This wonderful trail follows the shoreline of Georgian Bay on Lake Huron. The Georgian Bay shoreline is noted for its impressive rock formations. You can see a touch of fall color starting to show in the trees along the trail. I will be visiting here again very soon to photograph the peak colors of Autumn. My scouting trips have been conducted to note the best spots along the trail so that when I return I will no exactly where I want to be. In the photo above I use the Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lensย  (my new favorite landscape lens)as I lay flat on the rock, resting my elbows on the granite for added stability, while I created the handheld image.

Rugged Fitness Trail Along Georgian Bay, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1/125 second

Rugged Fitness Trail Along Georgian Bay, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1/125 sec

I could not resist using the fisheye lens again to create a rounded perspective of this granite ‘staircase’ as it makes it way out into Georgian Bay. When a fisheye lens is pointed downward the horizon will become rounded, this makes me feel as though I am seeing the curvature of this planet. While this look is not everybody’s cup of tea, I think it is pretty cool ๐Ÿ™‚

Granite Rock Formation Along Georgian Bay Coast on the Rugged Fitness Trail. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1/100 sec

Granite Rock Formation Along Georgian Bay Coast on the Rugged Fitness Trail. Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200, f16 @ 1/100 sec

Once again I used the fisheye lens to create another rocky scene along the trail. The Sigma fisheye lens focuses down to 5.5 inches, which can be very effective at emphasizing foreground elements such as this wonderful granite formation covered with orange lichens. Note that there is very little distortion to this image as I held the lens perfectly square with the world to minimize the distortion causing properties of the lens.

Please remember to click on each photo to see the larger, sharper version.

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Georgian Bay Shoreline, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200 f16 @ 1/100

Georgian Bay Shoreline, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 200 – f16 @ 1/100

On the afternoon of August 22nd as a storm was approaching I ventured over to the North Shore Rugged Fitness Trail in Parry Sound, Ontario with the fisheye lens. This was my first visit to this section of the Georgian Bay shoreline and it will most certainly not be my last. In fact, I am planning to organize some landscape workshops at this location – stay tuned for more info on this. Georgian Bay is noted for its spectacular and photogenic scenery – a photographer’s paradise. The rugged and rocky terrainย  has been carved by glaciers and battered by waves, which have led to some very cool rock formations and patterns. During my visit I had a blast using my new Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye lens for an up-close and personal look at some of the splendid vistas I encountered. For the image above I had to precariously position myself and my feet to avoid seeing my toes on the bottom edge. Below are a few additional images, all created with the Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye lens.

Each of the images in this post received a touch of Nik’s Detail Extractor Tool from Color Efex 4. I will often use this tool on photographs that do have a significant amount of rugged and rocky terrain in them as it helps give the rock a nice boost in details.

Please remember to click on each of the images to see the larger, sharper version. And please take a moment to let me know which is your favorite.

Georgian Bay Shoreline, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens. ISO 200 f16 @ 1/125

Georgian Bay Shoreline, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens. ISO 200 – f16 @ 1/125

Georgian Bay Shoreline, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 100 f16 @ 1/100

Georgian Bay Shoreline, Parry Sound, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens, ISO 100 – f16 @ 1/100

As you can see in the above image, the sun came out and created a somewhat harsher than desired light on the scene. I did however feel that it was not all that bad, but that it would also be perfect for creating a black and white conversion with Nik’s Silver Efex Pro 2.

Georgian Bay Shoreline Parry Sound, Ontraio. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens. ISO 100 f16 @ 1/100

Georgian Bay Shoreline Parry Sound, Ontraio. Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens. ISO 100 – f16 @ 1/100

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Male Bullfrog Among Water Lily Leaves, Horseshoe Lake, Parry Sound, Ontario

Male Bullfrog Among Water Lily Leaves, Horseshoe Lake, Parry Sound, Ontario

Alas, the time of year has come where I head north to the family cottage on Horseshoe Lake in Ontario’s Parry Sound region. As a result the blog will be quiet for about one week. I hope to return with a new batch of froggie pics and even a few new images from one of Ontario’s premier photographic locations – Killbear Provincial Park. Below you will see a Black & White conversion of an image created at Killbear Provincial Park during one of my numerous visits last year.

In the bullfrog image above, if you click on it to see the larger, sharper version you will see the clear translucent skin floating beside the frog. Did you know that frog’s shed their skin and eat it too?

See ya all soon ๐Ÿ™‚

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Craigleith shoreline at Georgian Bay

 

Last Saturday I spent the day up at Craigleith, near Collingwood, Ontario on the shores of beautiful Georgian Bay. For landscape photography it is hard to beat the impressive vistas that abound on Georgian Bay. From Killbear to Killarney, the Bruce Peninsula, Flower Pot Island, and the 30,000 Islands the opportunities are endless. The shoreline at Craigleith is of special interest not just for the lovely scenes over the open water but also for the number of fossils that can easily be found here. After helping my daughter look for fossils along the rocky shore, I decided to try a few quick handheld landscapes and crashing wave images. I had to try them handheld as I hadn’t really planned on doing much photography so I left the tripod at home. Yikes! As soon as I saw the incoming waves crashing into the rocky shoreline I sure wished that I had brought the tripod along. I will most certainly be planning a return visit, preferably during windy conditions for some really big waves. Here are a few of the handheld wave images I captured on this day as well as one of the better fossils that we found embedded in the rocky shoreline. The fossil is that of a Trilobite which is roughly 300-400 millions of years old.

The wave images were all photographed with the Nikon D800 and a Nikon 80-400mm VR lens with a polarizing filter attached. The two wider view photos were photographed with the Nikon 12-24mm lens and polarizer on my Nikon D800. To bring out the details in the crashing waves I used the Photoshop plug-in, Color Efex 4 from Nik Software and selected the ‘Tonal Contrast’ filter to emphasize the details in the splashing water.

Hope you enjoy these photo and do remember to click on each image to see the larger, sharper version.

Incoming waves on Georgian Bay

Craigleith shoreline at Georgian Bay

Incoming waves on Georgian Bay

Trilobite fossil at Craigleith, Ontario

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I have been away for the last couple of weeks up in Ontario’s Parry Sound region where I have been photographing a variety of subjects that range from landscapes to environmental issues, avian to amphibian, and an endangered Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake. I have tried on several occasions to locate and photograph these remarkable snakes, Ontario’s only venomous snake. I discovered this specimen in Killbear Provincial Park on the shores of Georgian Bay. It was a young snake being only about 12-14 inches in length and a small two segment rattle, however, it’s markings were striking. As I photographed this snake for well over an hour, several folks stopped to see what I was taking photos of and I let them see an enlarged , close-up view of the snake through the Live View feature of the D800. The kids that stopped thought it was pretty awesome to see a close up view and personally the more folks that think these snakes are awesome critters the better chance they will have for survival. I was pleased that the snake had a peaceful pose to it. All to often I see photographs of rattlesnakes that are curled up and in position to strike, a clear indication of a snake that is agitated. And for the record, only one person has ever died in Ontario from an Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnake bite and that individual never sought treatment. Furthermore, roughly 25% of venomous snake bites are considered to be ‘dry’ bites, that is no venom is injected. The snakes would rather conserve their precious venom for subduing their next meal.

Since the snake was in rather heavy shade I bumped up the ISO to 800 and selected an aperture of f16 to keep as much of the snakes body as possible in focus. Once I composed the images that I wanted I switched the camera to ‘Live View’ mode and zoomed in on the snake’s head and eye and manually focused my tripod mounted Nikon 80-400mm VR lens (VR off). The more I play around with the usefulness of the “Live View’ mode the more I am liking it.

Click on each of the photos to view a larger, sharper version.

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