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Posts Tagged ‘autumn’

Autumn Colour, Parry Sound, Ontario Nikon D800, Nikon 200-55mm VR Lens @ 500mm ISO 800, f11 @ 1/100 sec Handheld from canoe

Autumn Color, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikon 200-500mm VR Lens @ 500mm
ISO 800, f11 @ 1/100 sec
Handheld from canoe

A follow-up to my previous post where I featured the juvenile Common Loon that I photographed using the new Nikon AF-S 200-500mm f5.6E ED VR Lens. After I was finished photographing the very cooperative young loon, I spent some additional time in the canoe paddling along the shoreline of Horseshoe Lake and also exploring the nearby wetland. One of my most favorite things about the 200-500mm zoom range of this lens is that it fits so perfectly with my love of creating intimate landscapes. Being able to zoom in on a given scene and extract various intimate scenes from within the grand landscape is a ton of fun. Here is a selection of my three favorites, each created using the impressive 4.5 stops of vibration reduction while handholding the lens from the canoe.

Please click on each image to view the larger, sharper version.

Eastern larch in Autumn Nikon D800, Nikon 200-500mm Lens @ 500mm ISO 400, f11 @ 1/160 sec Handheld

Eastern larch in Autumn, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikon 200-500mm Lens @ 500mm
ISO 400, f8 @ 1/160 sec
Handheld from canoe

Autumn color, Parry Sound, Ontario Nikon D800, Nikon 200-500mm Lens @ 500mm ISO 800, f11 @ 1/160 sec. Handheld

Autumn color, Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikon 200-500mm Lens @ 500mm
ISO 800, f11 @ 1/160 sec.
Handheld from canoe

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Autumn Oak Sapling_5168

For my final installment for the #treesinfourseasons photo challenge I bring you an Oak tree sapling photo which was created a couple of years ago on a frosty morning in the Parry Sound District of Ontario. I was immediately drawn to the frosted red leaves as they contrasted nicely with the yellow Aspen leaves below. Using my trusty Nikon 105mm micro lens I positioned my tripod low to the ground to create the photo.

I challenge my friend and colleague Kyle McDougall to the #treesinfourseasons challenge.

Your challenge images must represent all four seasons, one from each season. With each entry please challenge one other person and use the hashtag #treesinfourseasons so everyone can search to find all the entries as the challenge progresses.

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6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Colour

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

On Tuesday, October 8th I spent the day with Denise Ippolito photographing in the Coldwater area just north of Toronto. We were in search of some lovely autumn scenery however, with the prolonged heavy rains that we endured on the past weekend much of the autumn foliage had fallen. As we drove around we did come across some lovely stands of Aspen trees that were set among a mix of yellows and reds, following Denise’s lead I set my my Nikon D800 to it’s multiple exposure setting, dialing in a total of 6 images for this technique. The results we achieved by doing so quite lovely and the images photographed using Denise’s multiple exposure technique turned out to be my favorites of the season. To learn more about this technique for photographing such scenes head over to Denise’s blog here where she explains how she created this killer effect.

I am off to the Parry Sound region to close the cottage for the coming winter, so the blog will be quiet for the next few days.

Please remember to click on each of the images to view the larger, sharper versions.

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

 

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

 

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

6 Image Multiple Exposure of Aspen Trees and Autumn Color

 

 

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Algonquin Provincial Park

I love going out to shoot in overcast, drizzly weather conditions and my favorite lens to use on these days, if I am not shooting waterfalls with my wide angle zoom, is my Nikon 80-400mm VR lens. I love to use this lens to extract images from within the landscape and to shoot blurs. The Nikon 80-400mm VR lens has one major drawback to it though, and that is the poorly designed tripod collar. When I first began using this lens, many years ago, I immediately became aware of the vibration transmitted through the lens by the camera’s mirror. Vibraton that will compromise image quality. Fortunately there is a solution available. Kirk Enterprises offers a tripod replacement collar that firmly cradles the lens eliminating the vibration problem. You can view the replacement collar here. When I use the lens to shoot blurs I like to use it in the 200-400mm range and often I will handhold the lens for camera movement blurs. When I am relying on mother nature to create the blur via wind or flowing water, I lock the camera and lens firmly to my tripod by means of the replacement tripod collar.¬† Some of my recent¬† intimate landscapes and blurs can be seen below that were created with this lens during this year’s autumn outings. Head over here to see my favorite image from my Lake Superior Provincial Park trip in September. Don’t forget to hit the ‘like’ button:).

Lichen Covered Dead Tree

Autumn Reflection in Horseshoe Lake

Torrance Barrens near Gravenhurst, Ontario

Handheld Autumn Birch Tree Blur

Torrance Barrens near Gravenhurst, Ontario

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Brook’s Falls on the Magnetawan River

I was away last week shooting some fall colour images around the Muskoka region and the Almaguin Highlands region of Ontario. Much of the autumn display this year in those locations was rather dismal, in my opinion, with many of the colours being muted and leaves falling from the trees brown and dry. We experienced a very hot and dry August which probably impacted the fall colours this year, however, there were some small pockets of nice colour to be found. During my travels last week I was sure to stop by my favorite waterfalls in the region and was pleased that some nice colour was to be found at these sites. Each of these sites will be featured in my upcoming eBook. Here are the first optimized images from last weeks adventures. Hope you like the photos.

Stubb’s Falls on the Little East River in Arrowhead Provincial Park

Lower Rosseau Falls on the Rosseau River

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Beaver Pond and Fall Colour

Over the last few days I was up at Horseshoe Lake and took advantage of the over-cast, rainy conditions to shoot some backwoods beaver ponds that I frequently explore. As usual, there are always a few trees that go into peak autumn foliage several weeks early than the rest of the trees. I made my way to this pond by following along several older beaver ponds and streams that connect the ponds, making note of the bear tracks along the way. As I made my way around a large fallen log at the edge of one pond I heard a splash in the water. I looked down to see my Lowepro lens case that I keep my Nikon 12-24mm lens floating in the pond. I jumped in to fetch the lens, unzipped the case and drained out the small amount of water that had leaked in. After drying the lens off with my t-shirt I began to examine the lens and it appeared that no water had leaked into the lens and no water reached the lens contacts. I further dried the lens with some micro-fiber cleaning cloths and created the image above, mostly to test the lens for moisture. So far all looks well, but just to be sure the lens will spend the next few days in a bag of silica gel that will absorb any moisture that cannot be seen. Being prepared for mishaps, should they unfortunately arrive, may just save the day. I always take along several micro-fibre cleaning cloths, clear plastic bags (for rain), knife, bear spray, electrical tape and an assortment of other things including my asthma inhaler. Many of these items are never needed, but you never know when they will be required.

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There always seems to be a lull in subjects to photograph in the time between autumn and winter…..or is there? I personally love this time of the year. This is when I await the frosty mornings, grab my macro lens and go photograph pre-winter details. Often there is very little colour remaining, but I love looking for patterns in the monochromatic leaves, that lay on the ground, coated in frost crystals. In my opinion, this time of year just can’t be beat for photographic opportunities. Hope you enjoy this selection of images.

Okay, this last one, below, isn’t monochromatic, but I love the ice crystals on the green aspen leaf.

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