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Archive for the ‘Animals’ Category

The March / April 2017 issue of the on-line photography magazine Wildlife Photographic is now available on the Apple App Store & the Google Playstore. This issue features many great articles, by accomplished photographers and is accompanied by equally fantastic wildlife imagery. My Bullfrog image appears on the cover of the magazine and my FROG-scapes 101 article on how I go about creating my signature frog-scape photography. If you do not already subscribe to this magazine please use this code freetialwp to receive a free three month subscrition. At the end of the three month trial you will need to subscribe through regular methods to continue receiving this great magazine. Please follow these instructions to start your free three month trial:

Download Wildlife Photographic from the Apple App Store  http://bit.ly/1aKP3qR or on Google Play http://bit.ly/1JOhMcW

Tap ‘Subscribe’ on the app home page

Tap ‘Current Subscribers’ from the drop down menu

Enter code freetrialwp

This code will be available to use until April 30, 2017

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Red Fox in Winter

Red Fox, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D500, Nikon 200-500mm lens @ 310mm ISO 100 f9 @ 1/500 sec

Red Fox, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D500, Nikon 200-500mm lens @ 310mm
ISO 100, f9 @ 1/500 sec

On the morning of Thursday February 9th I drove north to Ontario’s Algonquin Provincial Park for a day of wildlife photography with friend and colleague Don Johnston. It was a chilly morning with temperatures starting out at -17 degrees Celsius and warming up to about -7 degrees Celsius by early afternoon. After spending a number of hours photography Pine Marten we decided to try our luck with some of Red Foxes that have become overly habituated to human presence. Knowing this prior to my visit I instinctively knew that I wanted to try some wide angle close-up captures, so I took along my Nikon D800 with the Nikkor 18-35mm lens attached for the wide angle imagery and my Nikon D500 with the Nikkor 200-500mm lens for the telephoto captures. After a short trek along the unplowed winter road we could see two foxes out in the open area of the snow covered road. Once we arrived I decided to lay down in the snow and see what would happen. Since these foxes have become so accustomed to the human presence their curiosity brought them in close enough that I was able to capture a few wide angle close-up images of them. When they tired of me laying in the snow they wandered back closer to the forest’s edge whereby I was able to created numerous telephoto images of them. Here is a selection of my favorite images that I created of the Red Foxes in Ontario’s Algonquin Provincial Park. It was a great day and the foxes with their lush winter coat against the freshly fallen snow and clear blue skies was quite lovely however, it often too bright for the foxes as they would keep their eyes closed quite tightly due to the brightness of the day. I deleted a very large percentage of my image captures from this day simply due to the foxes having their eyes closed up too tightly.

Please do remember to click on each image to view the sharper, larger version.

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm ISO 200 f8 @ 1/1000 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm
ISO 200, f8 @ 1/1000 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm ISO 100 f8 @ 1/800 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm
ISO 100, f8 @ 1/800 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm ISO 200 f8 @ 1/800 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm
ISO 200, f8 @ 1/800 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 270mm ISO 500 f8 @ 1/1000 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 270mm
ISO 500, f8 @ 1/1000 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm ISO 200 f8 @ 1/1000 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm
ISO 200, f8 @ 1/1000 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm ISO 500 f8 @ 1/3200 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm
ISO 500, f8 @ 1/3200 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm ISO 100 f8 @ 1/400 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm
ISO 100, f8 @ 1/400 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm ISO 100 f8 @ 1/400 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D500, Nikkor 200-500mm lens @ 200mm
ISO 100, f8 @ 1/400 sec

 

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm ISO 200 f8 @ 1/800 sec

Red Fox in Winter, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
Nikon D800, Nikkor 18-35mm lens @ 35mm
ISO 200, f8 @ 1/800 sec

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reptiles-and-amphibians

On Saturday, January 7, 2017 I will be hosting a Reptile & Amphibian Photographic Workshop at Reptilia commencing at 8:30 a.m. sharp. The cost of the workshop will be $85, which includes admission to the Reptilia Zoo. We will be photographing each of the animals featured in the above card during the first two hours, before entering the Reptilia Zoo to photograph many species of snakes (both venomous and constrictors), alligators, and lizards for roughly another two hours. Generally  two to three hours provides ample time to photograph the reptiles located within the zoo after we have finished photographing the reptiles and amphibians in the controlled set-ups, but folks that wish to stay longer do have the remainder of the day available to spend in the zoo. This workshop will be limited to a maximum of 10 people. Payment for this workshop can be made via email transfer or by cheque. Please contact me at mclachlan@bell.net at your earliest convenience to reserve your spot for this workshop and for further info on sending payment.

To photograph these subjects I do find it best use a 100mm macro lens, or other lenses with close focusing capability. You will also need to bring along your flash and either a flash sync cord or a wireless flash trigger as we will be working with off camera flash and preferably a flash bracket that will allow you to position the flash out over the lens to yield the optimum results. I often have two spare off-camera macro flash brackets that folks can borrow for the day should they be in need of such a bracket and a couple of killer home-made flash diffusers too. The room in which we photograph the reptiles and amphibians does have a tendency to get rather warm so you may wish to wear light clothing. To photograph the reptiles in the zoo afterwards lenses that cover the 100mm to 300mm range will be preferable. Tripods have a tendency to become an exercise in frustration when photographing reptiles and amphibians, which is why I recommend using off camera flash and hand-holding so that you will have the mobility to capture these quick-moving subjects.

During this workshop we will photograph the following species:

  • Vietnamese Moss Frog
  • Red-eyed Tree Frogs
  • Blue & Black Dart Frog (Dendrobates auratus)
  • Fire Salamander
  • Green Tree Python
  • Rainbow Boa

Each of these species will be photographed in “natural-like” settings using my popular, home-made mini-pond, stunning tropical plants in full bloom, as well as an array of natural props so that each set-up will offer something unique. Your images will look like you just spent an awesome day in the jungle photographing these amazing and colourful critters. Do get your name in early as I have several folks already anticipating the announcement of this workshop.

 

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Red-eyed Tree Frog - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec

Red-eyed Tree Frog – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec

 

The recently concluded Frogs of the World Photographic Workshop was a great success with the amphibians being very co-operative. The workshop participants came away with a stunning selection of imagery, of which I will share with you in a soon to be published blog post. A beautiful selection of tropical plants was sourced out to maintain natural looking set-ups to mimic what would we would find in the native habitats of each species we were photographing. This past workshop featured a couple of new additions as well – Dendrobates auratus dart frog and a Fire Salamander! Here are a few of the images I created in between assisting the workshop participants with their compositions and off camera flash techniques.

I will be hosting the next workshop in January and will likely mix it up a bit with some amphibians and a couple of very colorful, non-poisonous snakes!!! Please send me an email at info@andrewmclachlan.ca to be added to the “early-bird sign-up list” and you to can be creating stunning images of these incredibly beautiful and colorful critters without slogging through the swamp!

Do remember to click on each of the images to see the larger, sharper version.

 

Red-eyed Tree Frog - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Red-eyed Tree Frog – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Fire Salamander - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Fire Salamander – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Fire Belly Toad - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Fire Belly Toad – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Dendrobates auratus - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Dendrobates auratus – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

White's Tree Frog - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

White’s Tree Frog – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Red-eyed Tree Frog - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Red-eyed Tree Frog – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Vietnamese Moss Frog - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Vietnamese Moss Frog – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Dendrobates auratus - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Dendrobates auratus – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

Red-eyed Tree Frog - captive Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

Red-eyed Tree Frog – captive
Nikon D800, Nikon 105mm Micro Lens
Nikon SB400 on a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket
ISO 100, f16 @ 1/60 sec.

 

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Bullfrog in Wetland Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm Fisheye lens ISO 400, f16 @ 1/200 sec.

Bullfrog in Wetland
Nikon D800, Sigma 15mm Fisheye lens
ISO 400, f16 @ 1/200 sec.

This post is intended to be a cautionary note on photographing from canoes. My frog-scape imagery is always created from a seated position within my canoe, while I lean over the edge of the canoe’s gunwale. I have done this thousands of times however, on the day of August 27th while doing so my left hand went to sleep. I shook it off and was good to go. Later that evening my left shoulder began to ache. By the next morning the pain was worsening and by the following day my left hand began going numb. I figured a visit to the emergency ward of my local hospital was in order. I was told I had a swollen rotator cuff and that I would be all better in one week. This was not to be and in fact my left arm is still sore and my left thumb, left index finger are still numb, and my tricep muscle will not flex. After 5 weeks I do believe I finally have an accurate diagnosis as to what happened. While leaning over the edge of the canoe, I was leaning in such a way that my underarm was directly over the gunwale putting too much pressure on the brachial plexus, which is the network of nerves that control the shoulder, arm, and hand. The resulting pressure has bruised or damaged my brachial plexus and now I require a referral to a neurologist for a nerve conduction test and to determine the extent of the injury. Hopefully there will be a full recovery but it will take a very long time as nerves regenerate at a very slow pace. Fortunately I do have full movement of my arm with the discomfort subsiding to a very tolerable level however, the arm is weak due to the inactive tricep muscle and the thumb and index finger numbness is rather annoying at times…time will tell if these issues will resolve themselves. Here are some of my most recent frog-scape images that I created prior to this injury.

Bullfrog in Wetland Nikon D800, Laowa 15mm f4 1:1 Macro Lens ISO 1000, f16 @ 1/30 sec.

Bullfrog in Wetland
Nikon D800, Laowa 15mm f4 1:1 Macro Lens
ISO 1000, f16 @ 1/30 sec.

 

Bullfrog in Wetland Nikon D800, Laowa 15mm f4 1:1 Macro Lens ISO 800, f16 @ 1/100 sec.

Bullfrog in Wetland
Nikon D800, Laowa 15mm f4 1:1 Macro Lens
ISO 800, f16 @ 1/100 sec.

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Green Mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps), Captive ©Don Johnston

Green Mamba (Dendroaspis angusticeps) – Captive
©Don Johnston

In this post I want to feature some of the images created by two of the clients that attended my first Frogs of the World Workshop on March 5th. It was a pleasure to meet Don Johnston and Keith Carroll, and both created some very lovely images. Keith and Don had great success using off-camera flash and their 100mm Macro lenses during the frog portion of the workshop and Don used his Nikon 200mm Micro lens and off-camera flash to photograph some very impressive reptile images in the Reptilia Zoo. Don Johnston came up with an interesting idea and subsequent effect during the workshop by using a small plant mister to create a rainfall effect, and in his Red-eyed Tree Frog image the frog seems to be quite enjoying the little shower 🙂

For folks that may be interested, I am hosting my second Frogs of the World Workshop on April 30th. More information about that workshop can be found here. There are still some spaces available, but they are going quickly. Please contact me at info@andrewmclachlan.ca if you are ready to sign up for the workshop.

Please remember to click on each of the images to view the larger, sharper version and please let Don and Keith know which of their images are your favorites 🙂

 

Red-eyed Tree Frogs ©Keith Carroll

Red-eyed Tree Frogs – Captive
©Keith Carroll

 

American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis), Captive ©Don Johnston

American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis) – Captive
©Don Johnston

 

Red-eyed Tree Frog ©Keith Carroll

Red-eyed Tree Frog – Captive
©Keith Carroll

 

Green Tree Python (Morelia viridis, Captive ©Don Johnston

Green Tree Python (Morelia viridis) – Captive
©Don Johnston

 

Red-eyed Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas), Captive ©Don Johnston

Red-eyed Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas) – Captive
©Don Johnston

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Common Snapping Turtle Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens Nikon Circular Polarizing Filter ISO 800, f11 @ 1/320

Common Snapping Turtle
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens
Nikon Circular Polarizing Filter
Handheld at ISO 800, f11 @ 1/320

A couple of weeks ago while I was in search of Bullfrogs in the wetland on Horseshoe Lake near Parry Sound, Ontario I came upon a very cooperative Common Snapping Turtle basking in the sun on a partially water-logged white pine tree trunk. Several years ago this large white pine trunk became stuck near the entrance to the wetland, but this past winter / spring it has moved deeper into the wetland to a location that is sure to find it being used by several species of turtles and watersnakes. I am eagerly awaiting my next extended stay at the lake to try for more reptile images.

Common Snapping Turtles are usually difficult to approach as they will often retreat into the water at first sight. I made a slow and cautious approach in my canoe hoping not to disturb the turtle and every few feet I would stop to create a few images. Do note in the above photo I used my Nikon Polarizing Filter to cut the glare from the vegetation as well as the turtle’s shell. I soon came to realize that this particular turtle was being very cooperative, so I proceeded a little closer. Soon I had pulled the canoe right up alongside of the turtle and yet it remained undisturbed. I quickly switched out my Nikon 80-400mm VR Lens for my Nikon 18-35mm Lens to create an up-close and personal wide-angle view, and employed my Live View technique that has often worked well for frog-scapes. While using the Live View feature on my Nikon D800 I will lean out over the side of the canoe and hold the camera very close to the water’s surface to get a very low perspective. Using the virtual horizon in Live View will assist in keeping the resulting photos square with the world.

The only thing that kinda bugs me about these snapping turtle photos is the very large bloodsucker that can be seen on the turtle’s left cheek 🙂

Do remember to click on each of the photos to see the larger, sharper version.

Common Snapping Turtle Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm Lens @ 35mm Handheld at ISO 400, f8 @ 1/1000

Common Snapping Turtle
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm Lens @ 35mm
Handheld at ISO 400, f8 @ 1/1000

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