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Archive for August 28th, 2017

Ameerega hahneli   ©Sherry Butts

This post is feature several images from some of the participants that attended the recently concluded Dart Frogs of the Amazon Rainforest Photographic Workshops on August 19th & 20th. We had a great group of folks for each date and tons of fun creating great images. We incorporated the use of props for some species to illustrate just how tiny they are. These props included a ten cent coin and the thumb of yours truly for a human touch 🙂 I am really proud of the images that the workshop participants created during these two events as well as their post processing skills. I will share more images from other participants when they are able to send their images along. Below are a few images from the first group of participants that were able to submit their images this week. Stay tuned for more images soon 🙂

First time participant Alan Jones made the trek from Michigan to attend both days of the workshop and created many great images using his Nikon D800 with the now discontinued Nikon 200mm Micro lens and the R1 Wireless Close-up Speedlight System I love the upright pose Alan captured of the Epipedobates tricolor, the side profile of the Phyllobates terribilis, and the low perspective for the Dendrobates leucomelas.

Dendrobates leucolemla   ©Alan Jones

Phyllobates terribilis   ©Alan Jones

 

Epipedobates tricolor   ©Alan Jones

 

Jennifer St. Louis was also a first time participant at the dart frog workshop. Jen was using a small soft box on her camera mounted flash to add a soft even light, which is something I may start incorporating. I absolutely love the image she captured of the Ranitomeya flavovitta below. Her low perspective allows the frog to stand out beautifully against the poster-like, out-of-focus background. Her image of the Hyalinobatrachium valerioi on the Monsterra leaf creates a nice sense of scale for this tiny tree frog and her Dendrobates leucomelas image really pops against the soft greens of the same leaf.

 

Ranitomeya flavovittata   ©Jen St. Louis

 

Hyalinobatrachium valerioi   ©Jen St. Louis

 

Dendrobates leucomelas   ©Jen St. Louis

 

Return workshop participant Don Johnston captured the Epipedobates tricolor on a 10 cent Canadian coin which really gives us a great sense of scale for this tiny but colorful frog. Don was also using the discontinued Nikon 200mm Micro lens with a light source provided by his Nikon SB900 Speedlight mounted to a Wimberley F-2 Macro Bracket. The benefit of using such a lens is that you gain more working distance, which can be most beneficial at times. Don’s capture of the Dendrobates tinctorius on the soft green moss (direct from Peru) pops nicely as does his Phylobates terribilis sitting on the Cordelyne leaf – what better combination than a bright yellow frog sitting on a bright purplish-pink leaf 🙂

 

Epipedobates tricolor   ©Don Johnston

 

Dendrobates tinctorius “azureus”   ©Don Johnston

 

Phyllobates terribilis   ©Don Johnston

 

Sherry Butts’, a returning workshop participant, opening image of the Ameerega hahneli reaching up to my thumb nail was only made better when the frog actually climbed up onto my thumb nail. Sherry was using one of my home-made flash diffusers to add soft, even lighting and while these custom-made diffusers are impracticable for field use they allow the workshop participant to create stunning imagery without the need to invest in expensive off camera flash brackets. Sherry loves going for a creative look in her images and as a result applied a beautiful texture overlay to her capture on the Phyllobates terribilis on a leaf stem.

 

Ameerega hahneli   ©Sherry Butts

 

Phyllobates terribilis   ©Sherry Butts

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