Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Andrew_McLachlan_Ontario_Landscape_Cover

I am looking forward to presenting “A Photographer’s Guide to the Ontario Landscape”  on Tuesday April 14th to the Toronto Digital Photography Club. The presentation will be starting at 7:30 p.m. at the Edithvale Community Centre located at 131 Finch Ave West in Toronto. As usual, I will be offering copies of my eBook (on CD) to those in attendance, at the presentation special of $20 CDN.

“A Photographer’s Guide to the Ontario Landscape” is an extensive guide to landscape photography in Ontario complete with driving directions to each of the one-hundred plus locations featured within the guide. It is the only such guide that is available to folks, guiding them around the province to many beautiful vistas. The guide was published in 2011 by Birds As Art Books (Arthur Morris) and is also available for purchase on-line here, however, the presentation special does not apply to on-line sales.

Brown Booby (male) Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 400mm ISO 400, f16 @ 1/125 second

Brown Booby (male)
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 400mm
ISO 400, f16 @ 1/125 sec.

During my visit to Cayman Brac in February 2014 I was able to photograph the Brown Booby colony on the island as they were incubating their eggs. I kept hoping that the eggs would hatch before I departed the island, but no such luck, so I planned my recent trip to be slightly later in to the nesting season to be assured of hatchlings at the nest.

Brown Booby pair at Nest Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 330mm ISO 800, f11 @ 1/250 second

Brown Booby pair at Nest
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 330mm
ISO 800, f11 @ 1/250 sec.

On Cayman Brac the Brown Booby nests at the very edge of the 144 foot bluff that dominates the east end of the tiny island (Cayman Brac is roughly 12 miles long and about 1 mile wide). My timing for my recent March 2015 visit was perfect as there were birds sitting on eggs, parents with chicks, and chicks that had began molting. Shortly before sunset I would make way to the trail that follows the edge of the bluff to photograph in the warm glow of the setting sun.

Brown Booby with Chick at the Nest Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 120mm ISO 200, f11 @ 1/500 second

Brown Booby with Chick at the Nest
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 120 mm
ISO 200, f11 @ 1/500 sec.

The experience of being able to sit and watch these majestic seabirds with their young at the very edge of the bluff is one I will not soon forget, nor is the sight of the fluffy, white chicks stretching their little wings that will one day enable them to glide over the ocean waves and plummet into the sea to catch their prey.

Brown Booby Chick Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 230mm ISO 100, f8 @1/250 second

Brown Booby Chick
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 230mm
ISO 100, f8 @1/250 sec.

During my two weeks on Cayman Brac I created several thousand photos of the Brown Booby. This post represents some of my most favorite images…hope you like them too :)

Do remember to click on the images to see the larger, sharper versions.

Brown Booby Chick Molting Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 400mm ISO 800, f8 @ 1/160 second

Brown Booby Chick Molting
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 400mm
ISO 800, f8 @ 1/160 sec.

Brown Booby Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 280mm ISO 1250, f8 @ 1/80 second

Brown Booby
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 280mm
ISO 1250, f8 @ 1/80 sec.

Brown Booby with Chick at the Nest Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 360mm ISO 200, f16 @ 1/250 second

Brown Booby with Chick at the Nest
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 360mm
ISO 200, f16 @ 1/250 sec.

Brown Booby with Chick at the Nest Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 330mm ISO 400, f11 @ 1/320 second

Brown Booby with Chick at the Nest
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 330mm
ISO 400, f11 @ 1/320 sec.

Brown Booby with Chick Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 400mm ISO 400, f16 @  1/250 sec.

Brown Booby with Chick
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 400mm
ISO 400, f16 @ 1/250 sec.

Brown Booby (female) Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 400mm ISO 200, f11 @ 1/500 sec.

Brown Booby (female)
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR @ 400mm
ISO 200, f11 @ 1/500 sec.

Sunrise on the South Shore of Cayman Brac Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm ISO 50, f16 @ 1/5 second 3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

Sunrise on the South Shore of Cayman Brac
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm
ISO 50, f16 @ 1/5 second
3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

Since my return from Cayman Brac in the Cayman Islands I have been busy processing the images created during my two weeks on the island as well as getting caught up on a backlog of work. The terrain of Cayman Brac is mostly that of what is referred to as the “Iron Shore” however, there are a few sandy beach locations and also a very rugged cliff on the east end of the island. Cayman Brac is roughly 12 miles long by about 1 mile wide so getting around the island to photogenic locations is never really a challenge.

For my two week stay on the island I rented a villa on the south shore that has a lovely sandy beach with a few strewn rocks that were often my subjects for sunrise imagery due to their photogenic appearance.

Daybreak on the South Shore of Cayman Brac Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 20mm ISO 50, f25 @ 0.8 seconds 3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

Daybreak on the South Shore of Cayman Brac
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 20mm
ISO 50, f25 @ 0.8 seconds
3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

For the sunrise imagery over the Caribbean Sea my number one, go-to filter was the Singh Ray 3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter. A reverse grad filter has the darkest density in the center of the filter and will transition to the lighter density has you approach the top of the filter, therefore, it does an excellent job of holding back the brightness of the sun when it is on the horizon without over darkening the upper portions of the sky.

Pollard Bay at Sunrise on Cayman Brac Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm ISO 100, f16 @ 10 seconds Singh Ray 3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

Pollard Bay at Sunrise on Cayman Brac
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm
ISO 100, f16 @ 10 seconds
3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

On the morning I decided to make way up to Pollard Bay for sunrise opportunities on the eastern end of the island I was rewarded with a beautiful sky, and I was immediately drawn to the numerous tide pools reflecting the sky’s colors. The iron shore here is also adorned with lovely green vegetation. After the sunrise image opportunities ended I walked along the shore towards the base of the brac – a Scottish word for bluff.The walk to the base of the bluff was relatively easy, with only one section that would have been treacherous during rough seas, but the seas were not too bad and all I had to contend with was a touch of ocean spray as the waves crashed into the rugged shore.

Rugged Shoreline on Cayman Brac Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm ;ens @ 35mm ISO 50, f16 @ 1/25 sec. Nikon Polarizing Filter

Rugged Shoreline on Cayman Brac
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 35mm
ISO 50, f16 @ 1/25 sec.
Nikon Polarizing Filter

Crashing Wave on Cayman Brac Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 95mm ISO 50, f25 @ 1/8 sec Nikon Polarizing Filter

Crashing Wave on Cayman Brac
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 95mm
ISO 50, f25 @ 1/8 sec
Nikon Polarizing Filter

The north shore of Cayman Brac provided nice opportunities for sunset images, however, on most evenings as the sun was setting the skies were uncloudy. With little interest in the cloudless skies it was often best to have a minimal amount of sky within the compositions and concentrate on foreground details. Lengthy exposures would blur the ocean’s wave action into a pleasing misty appearance.

Twilight on Cayman Brac's North Shore Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm ISO 100, f16 @ 6 seconds

Twilight on Cayman Brac’s North Shore
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm
ISO 100, f16 @ 6 seconds

Often during my morning sunrise sessions the sun would end up rising into a bank of clouds and present a lovely display of crepuscular rays – below is one of my most favorite such displays that I witnessed.

Please do remember to click on each image to view the larger, sharper versions.

Crepuscular Rays Over the Caribbean Sea Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 80mm ISO 50, f22 @ 1/13 second

Crepuscular Rays Over the Caribbean Sea
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 80mm
ISO 50, f22 @ 1/13 second

Daybreak at Pollard Bay on Cayman Brac Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm ISO 100, f16 @ 1 second Singh-Ray 3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

Daybreak at Pollard Bay on Cayman Brac
Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm
ISO 100, f16 @ 1 second
Singh-Ray 3-Stop Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter

I returned from my 14 day stay on the Caribbean island of Cayman Brac late on March 19th. Since my return I have been busy getting caught up on various things and processing a few of my initial favorites, from the vast number of images created during the trip. Today’s post will highlight my most favorite photos from the trip and in subsequent posts I will get into the nitty-gritty of what worked, what didn’t work, and the techniques used to create the images.

During my trip there were many lovely sunrises, a few nice sunsets, lots of Brown Booby chicks, reptiles, amphibians, and it seemed like with each day of snorkeling, which was everyday, I found something really cool to photograph in the ocean too :)

Here are a few images from this recent trip to Cayman Brac.

Please do remember to click on each of the images to see the larger, sharper version. Hope ya like ’em :)

Male Brown Booby with Chick Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 400mm ISO 400, f16 @ 1/320 sec.

Male Brown Booby with Chick
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 400mm
ISO 400, f16 @ 1/320 sec.

Hurricane Crab Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 80mm ISO 100, f25 @ 1/60 sec. Canon 500D Close-up Filter

Hurricane Crab
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 80mm
ISO 100, f25 @ 1/60 sec.
Canon 500D Close-up Filter

Cuban Treefrog Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 195mm ISO 100, f22 @ 1/60sec Canon 500D Close-up Filter

Cuban Treefrog
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 195mm
ISO 100, f22 @ 1/60sec
Canon 500D Close-up Filter

The Bat Cave Nikon D800, Sigma f2.8 EX DG 15mm Fisheye Lens ISO 100, f16 @ 0.6 sec.

The Bat Cave
Nikon D800, Sigma f2.8 EX DG 15mm Fisheye Lens
ISO 100, f16 @ 0.6 sec.

Octopus Sony RX100 @ 10.4mm (28mm equivlent) ISO 400, f8 @ 1/1000 sec

Octopus
Sony RX100 @ 10.4mm (28mm equivlent)
ISO 400, f8 @ 1/1000 sec

Rock Iguana Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 390mm ISO 100, f8 @ 1/800 sec

Rock Iguana
Nikon D800, Nikon 80-400mm VR lens @ 390mm
ISO 100, f8 @ 1/800 sec

Stonefish Sony RX100 @ 10.4mm (28mm equivalent) ISO 400, f8 @ 1/500 sec.

Stonefish
Sony RX100 @ 10.4mm (28mm equivalent)
ISO 400, f8 @ 1/500 sec.

 

 

image

On Thursday morning I start my long day of travel back home to Ontario from my two week stay on the Caribbean Island of Cayman Brac. This morning’s sunrise was probably the best during my two weeks here. I grabbed a quick cellphone snap of it, to share, using the HDR feature, that I love, on my Samsung Note 2.

See ya soon :)

image

Here’s a quick cellphone snap using the HDR feature on my Samsung Note 2. I did a pre-dawn trip to Pollard Bay this morning for sunrise imagery and then explored the rugged coast along the base of the 144 foot bluff located at the east end of the island.

My snorkeling trips have been very productive and I will share those photos with you once I return to Ontario and have time to process the image files. So far I have captured some nice photos of: Octopus,  Caribbean Reef Squid, Stonefish , Sand Divers, and Stingrays.

See you soon :)

Cayman Brac

image

I have arrived on the beautiful island of Cayman Brac. After some much needed rest after a long day of travel yesterday I am ready to begin exploring the area above and below the sea. Cayman Brac will be my home for the next two weeks ☺

At dusk on the day before I left Ontario the snowy owl that has been over – wintering in the fields behind my house finally landed on a more suitable perch, instead of the usual barn roof or hydro poles. Below is my favorite of the many images I created of the owl. I photographed her until my fingers were numb from the cold, won’t need to worry about that for the next 14 days ☺

image

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 708 other followers

%d bloggers like this: