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Posts Tagged ‘waterfalls’

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm, ISO 100, f22 @ 1 second.

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 22mm, ISO 100, f22 @ 1 second.

When I am out photographing along rivers and waterfalls I always take the time to stand and watch the flow of the river to predict how it will blur during longer exposures. I will then select a perspective to compliment that flow. Note in this image of Hatchery Falls in Ontario’s popular Muskoka region that the river is flowing on a diagonal from right to left and exiting the frame in the lower left corner. Also make note that I selected a composition that allowed for a clean bottom edge, which often makes for a more pleasing composition. I did not however arrive at this composition from the get go. I worked the situation, fine tuning and tweaking my perspective until I was happy with the results. I am eagerly looking forward to photographing Hatchery Falls in the coming weeks when the autumn colors will be all a blaze.

Please click on the image to see the larger, sharper version.

 

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Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma f2.8 EX DG 15mm Fisheye Lens. ISO 50 f22 @ 1/5 sec.

Hatchery Falls, Muskoka, Ontario. Nikon D800, Sigma f2.8 EX DG 15mm Fisheye Lens. ISO 50 f22 @ 1/5 sec.

 

I have just returned from a week away in the Parry Sound & Muskoka regions of Ontario where I had a blast using my newest and favorite photographic tool; the Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Fisheye Lens. On of my chosen destinations was Hatchery Falls on the Skeleton River near the town of Rosseau. I had previously visited this waterfall during the winter months and wanted to return this summer and for the soon to come autumn scenes. I created several various compositions on this recent visit which I will share with you shortly. Do note that when the fisheye lens is positioned as square as possible with the world there is minimal distortion of the scene. My chosen perspective for this scene was determined after carefully studying the flow of the river and then ensuring that I captured the interesting detail as the river exits the composition.

Please remember to click on the image to see the larger, sharper version.

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Rosseau River_600

During my last stay at the family cottage on Horseshoe Lake in Ontario’s Muskoka region I chose to visit Lower Rosseau Falls on a rain-filled day. As I made the half hour trek over to the river there was a persistent drizzle, which is absolutely perfect for waterfall photography. As soon as I arrived, as luck would have it, the skies began to look as though it was going to clear up. I rushed to garb a few images before the river was in full sun. Rather than depart and head back when the sun shone full, I decided to play around with the Nikon D800’s in-camera HDR feature for both the sunlit scenes and the those whereby I waited for some cloud cover. This feature will produce a 108 MB TIFF file!

What else is new with the images in this post? I have processed and sharpened all of them using the new TKAction Panel from Tony Kuyper. If you enjoy photographing landscapes and wish to get the absolute most out of your image files then simply click here and read through and watch the videos as well. On the Special Offer page you can purchase the complete package for only $79US.

Please click on the images to see the larger, sharper versions and let me know which one is your favorite :)

Rosseau River_611

Rosseau River_637

Rosseau River_626

 

 

 

Rosseau River_659

 

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Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Ontario, Canada

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

How often do you revisit locations for landscape photography? I do so often. Why? As each season passes and years fall away conditions change. These images of Lower Rosseau Falls in Ontario’s famous Muskoka region are the perfect example. Over the last few years the water levels have been much lower, but with the region being hit with a significant amount of snowfall this past winter, the subsequent snowmelt has raised water levels so that the river is now a raging torrent. This has created numerous, new photographic possibilities and has seen the return of the double cascade created by the rock mid-stream in the above photo.

To find out how to get to Lower Rosseau Falls and to learn more about great Ontario landscape photography locations please consider my eBook “A Photographer’s Guide to the Ontario Landscape” – the first ever comprehensive guide to landscape photography in Ontario.

Do click on each of these images to see the larger, sharper versions.

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada.

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

Lower Rosseau Falls, Rosseau River, Muskoka, Ontario, Canada

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A Waterfall Along the Nottawasaga River, Organgeville, Ontario

Secluded Woodland Waterfall on the Nottawasaga River near Orangeville, Ontario

The above artistic rendering of a small waterfall located along the Nottawasaga River near Orangeville, Ontario was created using the Photoshop plug-in Topaz Simplify, which is available from Topaz Labs. I visited this waterfall a few years ago and have had the image sitting on the back-burner ever since. This evening I decided it was time to optimize the image file and play around with creating a painterly-like version of it as well. Below you will see the original version of this lovely, secluded waterfall.

Secluded Woodland Waterfall on the Nottawasaga River. Orangeville, Ontario.

Secluded Woodland Waterfall on the Nottawasaga River near Orangeville, Ontario.

In other news: the May issue of the Creative Photography E-Mini-Magazine (The Mini-Mag) is now available on-line here. This wonderful, absolutely free, on-line creative photography magazine is published monthly by Denise Ippolito. Do check out this magazine that is full of useful and creative tips and to see the latest froggie article by yours truly click here.

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Daybreak on the Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park

Daybreak on the Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

There is always a lull in the seasons between autumn and winter where I like to get caught up on optimizing images that I have captured throughout the year, but have not yet found the time to process the files. Today I was planning on doing some chores that are waiting outside in the yard, but with the first light dusting of snow falling last night I decided to stay inside and work on some of these images today. So, I began sifting through the photos that I created on my Lake Superior trip in September.

When I began reviewing the images I came upon those that I created on what was a bitter cold morning on the Pinguisibi Trail. This linear trail follows the Sand River.In all my previous trips to this area the Sand River was running very low, but not this time. Heavy rains the week before my arrival ensured that there was significant water in the river. In fact, there was too much water as one of the waterfalls up river was flowing with such intensity that it was impossible to photograph due to the spray coming off the river. As a result, I concentrated my efforts downstream away from the intense flow. Here are a few of the images of the Sand River from that day.

Please do remember to click on the images to see the larger, sharper versions.

Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park

Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

 

Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park.

Sand River, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

 

Sand River in Black & White. Lake Superior Provincial Park.

Sand River in Black & White. Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario

 

 

 

 

 

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Hilton Falls_5511

As mentioned in my previous post, after photographing the old, rusted out cars and trucks in Rockwood, Ontario I made a brief visit to nearby Hilton Falls on Sixteen Mile Creek. This lovely waterfall is one of the many waterfalls that are found along the Niagara Escarpment and is located in the Hilton Falls Conservation Area.. When photographing waterfalls it is always wise to create images from several different perspectives.  One of the perspectives I am particularly fond of is that which can be created at the crest of the falls, looking over the edge. To photograph the scene above I chose to work from a narrow ledge beside the river at the crest of the falls. I excluded most of the surrounding forest due to the significant leaf fall, opting to include as much of the river’s flow pattern as possible. I did retain enough of the far bank and the brink of the cascade to maintain a sense of place in the resulting image. Hope you like the results :)

Please remember to click on the image to see the larger, sharper version.

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