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Posts Tagged ‘intimate landscapes’

Stubb’s Falls on the Little East River

Several weeks ago I met up with fellow landscape photographer, the very talented Kyle McDougall at Stubb’s Falls in Arrowhead Provincial Park near Huntsville, Ontario. After spending numerous hours at this location we ventured a little further north to Brook’s Falls near the town of Emsdale. I am just now finding the time to process a few of the image files from this day. We were blessed with some lovely autumn colour and beautiful overcast light which makes for perfect waterfall photography conditions. Most often after I photograph a few images of the grand scene before me, I will often seek out the more intimate scenes that are not so readily apparent. My favorite lens for such intimate landscapes has always been the Nikon 80-400mm VR lens> On occasion I will use my Nikon 12-24mm lens when I wish to compose an intimate landscape image within tight quarters. Below are a few intimate landscapes from the trip to Stubb’s Falls and Brook’s Falls. Please take a moment to indicate your favorite of the bunch.

When you have a minute or two please do check out the additions to the blogroll which now include direct links to the blogs of Kyle McDougall, Mike Grandmaison, and John Shaw. In addition to these updates to the blogroll we now have a Twitter page. Click here for the Twitter page.

The November issue of Denise Ippolito’s Creative Photography eMini-Magazine is now published. Please follow the image-link in the side-bar of the blog to be taken directly to the emini-magazine. If you would like a real treat head over to Denise’s A Creative Adventure Blog for an amazing collection of images from her recent travels to the Falkland Islands and South Georgia Island.

Please remember to click on each of the photos to see a larger, sharper version.

Stubb’s Falls on the Little East River

Magnetawan River at Brook’s Falls

Magnetawan River at Brook’s Falls

Magnetawan River at Brook’s Falls

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Winter river details

Today was a rare day for the current winter season. We had snow! While we only received about 3 inches after a long period of freezing rain, it was nice to see the landscape cloaked in fresh snow. Once the driving conditions improved, I ventured down a few of the small gravel roads around my home to some nearby, smaller tributaries of the Nottawasaga River (a large river that empties into Georgian Bay) to photograph some winter river details. Winter often presents us with challenges when we are out photographing and one such challenge is finding away to incorporate some colour into the scene. In the above image, while standing at the side of the road, my eye was drawn to the golden-toned grasses that were submerged in the river. In the image below I walked down beside the river to change my perspective for an alternate look. The blue colouration in this photograph was achieved by capturing the scene after the sun had dipped below the horizon on a relatively clear evening.

Intimate winter river

Below is one of the first images I photographed at this location. While driving down the road, the jagged river ice here grabbed my attention and I decided to stop and explore the potential possibilities at this scene. I used my Nikon 80-400mm lens to reach out across the fragile snow and ice-scape to photograph this interesting river ice. The river is about a foot and a half below the ice formations in this photo and appears very dark as a result. It has a black and white sort of feel to it that I like.

All images in this post were photographed with my Nikon 80-400mm lens, which is my favorite lens for intimate landscape work.

River ice

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Algonquin Provincial Park

I love going out to shoot in overcast, drizzly weather conditions and my favorite lens to use on these days, if I am not shooting waterfalls with my wide angle zoom, is my Nikon 80-400mm VR lens. I love to use this lens to extract images from within the landscape and to shoot blurs. The Nikon 80-400mm VR lens has one major drawback to it though, and that is the poorly designed tripod collar. When I first began using this lens, many years ago, I immediately became aware of the vibration transmitted through the lens by the camera’s mirror. Vibraton that will compromise image quality. Fortunately there is a solution available. Kirk Enterprises offers a tripod replacement collar that firmly cradles the lens eliminating the vibration problem. You can view the replacement collar here. When I use the lens to shoot blurs I like to use it in the 200-400mm range and often I will handhold the lens for camera movement blurs. When I am relying on mother nature to create the blur via wind or flowing water, I lock the camera and lens firmly to my tripod by means of the replacement tripod collar.¬† Some of my recent¬† intimate landscapes and blurs can be seen below that were created with this lens during this year’s autumn outings. Head over here to see my favorite image from my Lake Superior Provincial Park trip in September. Don’t forget to hit the ‘like’ button :).

Lichen Covered Dead Tree

Autumn Reflection in Horseshoe Lake

Torrance Barrens near Gravenhurst, Ontario

Handheld Autumn Birch Tree Blur

Torrance Barrens near Gravenhurst, Ontario

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